Minor Hindu Dynasty of Medieval Indian

Minted Somewhere in Punjab region 

Ruler :- Bhoj deva !! 

Obverse: Horseman right, with Devanagari legend (Sri) Bhoja de(va) around

Reverse: Bull seated left, with

legend shri Samanta deva 

Minor Hindu Dynasty Of Medieval Indian Minted Somewhere In Punjab Region Ruler :- Bhoj Deva !! Obverse: Horseman Right, With Devanagari Legend (Sri) Bhoja De(Va) Around Reverse: Bull Seated Left, With Legend Shri Samanta Deva Bhoja Deva Coin Are Unpublished &Amp; Hard To Find In This Grade . Foot Note : - This Type Is Closely Linked With One Particular Imitative Pseudo-Madana, With The Same Features On Both Bull And Horseman. The Execution Of The Bull Is Careful, With A Nicely-Rendered Trisula On The Bull’s Rump And A Series Of Lines And Circles Defining The Horseman. Madana’s Reign Was About 1145-67, So These Coins Would Have Been Issued In The Second Half Of The 12Th Century. As To Minting Place, The Later Ghaznavids Of Lahore Controlled The Punjab Up To The Ghurid Conquest In 1186. They Issued Bull-Type Copper Coins Quite Dissimilar To This Coin. However, There Were A Number Of Tributary Rajas In The Punjab Hill Country, Up To And Including Jammu, Who Could Have Issued Their Own Base-Metal Coinage. Initially Imitating Madanapala Delhiwals, And Later Placing Their Own Name On The Coin. Until Better Historical Information Is Available.(John Deyell)

Bhoja deva coin are unpublished & hard to find in this grade . 

Foot note : –

This type is closely linked with one particular imitative pseudo-Madana, with the same features on both bull and horseman. The execution of the bull is careful, with a nicely-rendered trisula on the bull’s rump and a series of lines and circles defining the horseman. Madana’s reign was about 1145-67, so these coins would have been issued in the second half of the 12th century. 

As to minting place, the later Ghaznavids of Lahore controlled the Punjab up to the Ghurid conquest in 1186. They issued bull-type copper coins quite dissimilar to this coin. However, there were a number of tributary rajas in the Punjab hill country, up to and including Jammu, who could have issued their own base-metal coinage. Initially imitating Madanapala Delhiwals, and later placing their own name on the coin. Until better historical information is available.(John Deyell)

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